Wednesday, July 10, 2013

iSpot Lyme: New Generation of Testing From NeuroScience, Inc.

NeuroScience, Inc recently anounced the release of a new, and suppossedly more sensitive, Lyme test called iSpot Lyme (TM).

NeuroScience states that iSpot Lyme has a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 94% for the detection of Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb); making it an excellent complement to the current two-tiered antibody method of testing.

"The iSpot Lyme detects a cellular immune response against Lyme antigens, which appears earlier in the disease process (2 weeks) than the antibody response detected by the traditional Western Blot test (4-6 weeks). More importantly, iSpot Lyme can even detect antigen-specfic T cell response in seronegative patients" (iSpot Lyme: A New Approach to Lyme Disease Testing - The NEI Connection).

If this pans out, perhaps it will be the start of a new direction in better testing methods that will be more accurate and more widely available (being the standard and not the exception). And maybe it will lead to effectively testing for other strains of Borellia as well. That is much needed also. 

I've had good experiences in the past with other types of testing through NeuroScience (Pharmasan Labs). I think they hold a high standard in neurotransmitter testing. Perhaps they'll become a new high standard in accurate Lyme testing too. Let's hope so.

To read more about this new testing method check out iSpot Lyme: A New Approach to Lyme Disease Testing on The NEI Connection blog.

For more detailed information read the White Paper and download the PDF iSpot Lyme (TM): A New Generation of Lyme Disease Testing

When peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from a B. burgdorferi-infected patient are exposed to B. burgdorferi protein antigens (A) B. burgdorferi-specific T cells are activated and secrete small proteins called cytokines (B) T cells that are not specific for B. burgdorferi do not become activated. iSpot Lyme (TM) measures the cytokine IFN-gamma secreted by the patient's T cells. Cytokine proteins (IFN-gamma) are captured near the cells that secreted them and are then detected using a color reagent (C).

4 comments:

  1. I had this test. They messed up my first blood sample and I had to go in to give another. My test came out negative. Then they billed me a second time when I already paid the first time around. They refused to adjust my account and sent it in to collections. I say don't waste your time on this questionably accurate test and beware of their business practices!

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    1. Lisa, I'm sorry to hear this happened to you but thanks so much for sharing your experience. I hadn't heard from anyone yet whose had the iSpot done and was wondering myself. Appreciate you taking the time to comment. Perhaps this can help others weigh if they want to pursue a Lyme test through this lab or another one. Thanks again. Blesssings to you. ~ Michelle

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  2. My son had this test and tested positive. The company info says that it meets federal CLIA standards for test development and that they conducted studies on 500 people with Lyme and then also had acontrol group. I know the test is new and have been trying to find more info on the test other than company info.

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    1. Thanks so much for your input, Dianne. Appreciate you taking the time to comment about this. I hope your son's Lyme treatment goes well. All the best to you and your family. ~ Michelle

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